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Barcelona Modernisme Route
Ruta 6, Park Güell (83) – Mosaic de l’Església de Sant Pacià (115)
Pag >> 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6

Other unusual features of the Park Güell are its bridges and viaducts, with twisted, grotto-like columns. The fourth portico that connects the upper part with the lower part is perhaps the most Surrealist structure, with the leaning walls and arches that recall images by Dalí. The summit of the park is crowned by a monumental Calvary formed by three crosses at the place where Gaudí had planned to build the chapel. Even here the feverish architect had symbolic fantasies. If we look toward the east -toward Jerusalem, as it were- the perspective seems to merge all three crosses into one. This is the final point of the ascent: the cross is the ultimate symbol.

The CASA-MUSEU GAUDÍ. (84). (GAUDÍ MUSEUM-HOUSE) is also within the boundaries of the park. The museum occupies the house in which Antoni Gaudí spent the last 20 years of his life and exhibits interesting elements on the life and work of the brilliant architect. Among other things, visitors can see furniture from Palau Güell (8), the Casa Calvet (27) and the Casa Batlló (45), personal objects and souvenirs of Gaudí, in addition to materials and elements of his personal work that provide a particular view of his complex and often vague personality. The house was built under the direction of Francesc Berenguer i Mestres, although the project was signed by Gaudí. The One-day route recommended by the Barcelona Modernisme Route ends here at Park Güell.

Casa Museu Gaudí

Address
Park Güell; ctra. del Carmel, 23A.
Open
December 25th and 26th, and January 1st and 6th, open from 10am to 2pm. October through March, 10am to 6pm; April to September, 9am to 8pm.
Information
Tel.: (+34) 932 193 811.

info@casamuseugaudi.org

http://www.casamuseugaudi.org/en/
Prices and discounts
Prices.

Adults: €5.50.

Students and pensioners: €4.50.

With the discount of the Modernisme Route: €4,50 (adults).
Description
The CASA MUSEU GAUDÍ. (84). (GAUDÍ HOUSE MUSEUM) is also within the boundaries of the park. The museum occupies the house in which Antoni Gaudí spent the last 20 years of his life and exhibits interesting elements on the life and work of the brilliant architect. Among other things, visitors can see furniture from the Casa Calvet (27) and the Casa Batlló (45), personal objects and souvenirs of Gaudí, in addition to materials and elements of his personal work that provide a particular view of his complex and often vague personality. The house was built under the direction of Francesc Berenguer i Mestres, although the project was signed by Gaudí. The One-day route recommended by the Barcelona Modernisme Route ends here at Park Güell.

To visit the next four houses, you can walk or take number 92 bus at the same stop where you got off for Park Güell. To see Casa Queralt and Finca San Salvador, you get off the bus at the stop called “Passeig de la Mare de Déu del Coll-Funoses Llussà”. The same bus takes you to Casa Comes d’Argemir, a few stops onward at “Avinguda República Argentina-Baixada Blanes”, and to Cases Ramos, again further on at the stop “Avinguda Príncep d’Astúries, 59”.

At the foot of Park Güell one can see the sprawling neighbourhood of Vallcarca, a zone of fervent urban chaos that conceals some small jewels of Modernisme. In Passeig de la Mare de Déu del Coll, near the Creueta del Coll Park (going up Carrer Funoses Llussà and Carrer Pineda), you will find CASA QUERALT (85) (Pineda, 12), a curious building by Josep Maria Jujol (1917). Very nearby, going a few metres down the Passeig, is another work by Jujol, a student of Gaudí, FINCA SAN SALVADOR (86) (SAN SALVADOR ESTATE) (Passeig de la Mare de Déu del Coll, 79 / Pineda, 9), built by Jujol in 1909 and used for years as the bottling plant of Font Radial, a natural spring discovered by chance when work was done on the hill. Jujol never actually finished this project, but he did complete a garden of small terraces adapted to the steep terrain and a series of artificial grottoes to reach the water source. The Barcelona Urban Landscape Institute began to draft a restoration and rehabilitation project for this peculiar place in 2004.

From this point you can continue down the Passeig (walking or on bus 92) and following the Viaduc of Vallcarca fins you will come to CASA COMAS D’ARGEMIR (87) (Avinguda de la República Argentina, 92) a work designed by Josep Vilaseca i Casanovas in 1904 that is worthy of attention. From the street one can see its façade in the form of a semi-ellipse, topped with a wrought iron railing with the initials of the owners’ names, and decorated with ceramics and discreet sgraffito work around the windows, decorated with lion heads, and the turret, crowned with a pointed dome adorned with blue trencadís.

Down República Argentina (walking or on bus 92) you will reach Plaça Lesseps, where you will find a spectacular yellow Modernista building decorated with floral motifs. The CASES RAMOS (88) (Plaça de Lesseps, 30, 31 and 32) are three buildings joined by a common façade built in 1906 by Jaume Torres i Grau. Do not miss the bee-shaped wrought iron banisters of the central balcony. The rear court, at the corner of Carrer Mont-Roig, still has a charming Modernista kiosk. Cinema fans should not miss this building: part of the film All About my Mother, by Pedro Almodóvar, was filmed here.

Another short downhill walk (or again bus 92) will take us to CASA VICENS (89) (Carolines, 18-24). This early work by Gaudí, built between 1883 and 1888, was a commission by Manuel Vicens, a Valencian tile manufacturer, to build a private house in the old municipality of Gràcia. The work had to fulfil two purposes: be the home of the Vicenses and advertise the excellent product that they manufactured. Gaudí gave this house characteristic forms, inspired by Indian and Japanese architecture, and covered a large part of the three façades with spectacular green and white glazed tiles. Gaudí used tiles in this building by exhibiting them in stark contrast to exposed brickwork. Another element of interest on the outside is the iron railing, which reproduces the attractive leaves of margalló, the endogenous Catalan palm species (Chamaerops humilis). Although the owners may be lenient with discreet visitors who take a step or two into the garden, the house is private property and the interior cannot be visited. Main features of the interior are a spectacular round smoking room, culminated with a Mudejar vault of multi-coloured plaster, elaborate floral decorations and carpentry in the living-room and, generally, the extravagant decoration in the purest style of a Caliph’s private chambers.

In the district of Sarrià-Sant Gervasi we find the neighbourhood of Pedralbes, the rich area par excellence of present-day Barcelona. This trend was begun by the Güell family when they decided to develop the land of their estate next to the Gothic Monastery of Pedralbes. Our walk through the district begins at the PAVELLONS GÜELL (90), (GÜELL PAVILIONS), of the old Güell Estate. Modernisme Centre of Barcelona, where you can buy the Modernisme Route Guidebook, with which you will be able to receive the free discount vouchers for the Route and information on Modernisme in Barcelona. Gaudí dedicated his life to his original vision of architecture and Eusebi Güell gave him the first means to make such an eccentric type of architecture into a reality. In 1883 Güell wanted to extend the estate that his father had bought and Gaudí was commissioned to carry out parts of this project, under the direction of Joan Martorell

Pavellons Güell

Address
Avinguda de Pedralbes, 7.
Open
Daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (last entrance at 3.30 p.m.).

Self guided with guided tour included:

        English 10.15, 11.15 and 3pm.

        Catalan 12.15pm.

        Spanish 1.15pm.

Closed in 1 and 6 January and 25 and 26 December.

Information
www.rutadelmodernisme.comTel.: (+34) 933 177 652. www.rutadelmodernisme.com
Further details
The Modernista visit of the old Finca Güell from Antoni Gaudí includes the period machinery and construction tools used by Gaudí, as well as the spectacular crane utilized for the construction of the building of Casa Milà (La Pedrera), and Modernisme and Society and the documentary about the Art Nouveau movement and its relationship with society at the turn of the twentieth century.

Timetables may vary.
Prices and discounts
Price:

Adults €5.00.

Children under 18 years of age and pensioners: €2,50.

From 0 to 6 years old: free entrance.

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 50%.

With "Bus turístic" Touristic Bus and City Tour:

Adults €4.00.

Children under 18 years of age and pensioners: €2,00.

Groups:

Previous booking is also possible by calling 932 562 504 or by e-mail to cultura-impuqv@bcn.cat

Group price: €150,00 (maximum 25 persons)

School groups €125,00 (maximum 25 persons)
Description
PAVELLONS GÜELL (90), (GÜELL PAVILIONS), of the old Güell Estate. Modernisme Centre of Barcelona, where you can buy the Modernisme Route Guidebook, with which you will be able to receive the free discount vouchers for the Route and information on Modernisme in Barcelona. Gaudí dedicated his life to his original vision of architecture and Eusebi Güell gave him the first means to make such an eccentric type of architecture into a reality. In 1883 Güell wanted to extend the estate that his father had bought and Gaudí was commissioned to carry out parts of this project, under the direction of Joan Martorell Gaudí designed the gatehouses and garden of the entrance to the estate from the old Sarrià road. In the late 19th century, the estate was mainly used as summer residence by the Güells, though its crops still provided some profit. For this job, Gaudí took inspiration from the Garden of the Hesperides as depicted by Jacint Verdaguer in his great epic poem L’Atlàntida. Verdaguer had dedicated this work -a sort of Catalan remake of Greek myths- to Güell’s father-in-law, the Marquis of Comillas, and had in fact finished writing the book on a stay in this very estate. The entrance features the striking Dragon Gate, a five-metre wrought iron sculpture that symbolises the mythological dragon of Verdaguer, with bat’s wings, a scaly body, great fangs and a sinuous tongue. The beast is not challenging Saint George here, but Hercules, as Verdaguer blended Catalan symbols with the classic references to produce his own images. The legendary tree in the Garden of Hesperides from which Hercules had to steal a golden apple, for instance, was in Verdaguer’s poem an orange tree, considered somewhat more Mediterranean. Crowning the right jamb of the gate, Gaudí placed a small sculpture of an orange tree, with little golden oranges. After the death of Eusebi Güell in 1918, the estate fell into disuse and the heirs granted part of the land for the construction of the Palau Reial de Pedralbes, the Spanish Royal Family’s official residence in Barelona. The gate, the old stables and gatekeeper’s house have been preserved and are now property of the University of Barcelona which in 2014 lent the space to Barcelona’s Municipal Institute for Urban Landscape until 2024 with the aim of opening it to the public and commencing with its restoration.

Gaudí designed the gatehouses and garden of the entrance to the estate from the old Sarrià road. In the late 19th century, the estate was mainly used as summer residence by the Güells, though its crops still provided some profit.

For this job, Gaudí took inspiration from the Garden of the Hesperides as depicted by Jacint Verdaguer in his great epic poem L’Atlàntida. Verdaguer had dedicated this work -a sort of Catalan remake of Greek myths- to Güell’s father-in-law, the Marquis of Comillas, and had in fact finished writing the book on a stay in this very estate. The entrance features the striking Dragon Gate, a five-metre wrought iron sculpture that symbolises the mythological dragon of Verdaguer, with bat’s wings, a scaly body, great fangs and a sinuous tongue. The beast is not challenging Saint George here, but Hercules, as Verdaguer blended Catalan symbols with the classic references to produce his own images. The legendary tree in the Garden of Hesperides from which Hercules had to steal a golden apple, for instance, was in Verdaguer’s poem an orange tree, considered somewhat more Mediterranean. Crowning the right jamb of the gate, Gaudí placed a small sculpture of an orange tree, with little golden oranges. After the death of Eusebi Güell in 1918, the estate fell into disuse and the heirs granted part of the land for the construction of the Palau Reial de Pedralbes, the Spanish Royal Family’s official residence in Barelona. The gate, the old stables and gatekeeper’s house have been preserved and are now property of the University of Barcelona.

Crossing Avinguda de Pedralbes is Passeig Manuel Girona, and a short walk away is another work by Gaudí, the PORTAL MIRALLES (91) of the Miralles Estate (Passeig de Manuel Girona, 55-61). Gaudí’s intervention (1901-1902) was limited to the undulating wall and the huge entrance gate to the estate with its peculiar metal-frame eaves.

If you walk along Passeig Manuel Girona and Ronda del General Mitre you will come to Carrer Ganduxer, now in the neighbourhood of Sarrià. On this street is the COL·LEGI DE LES TERESIANES (92) (THERESIAN SCHOOL Ganduxer, 85-105) which is not open to the public although on occasions, out of school hours, it is allowed to enter the garden and see it.

Col·legi de les Teresianes

Address
Ganduxer, 85-105.
Further details
The nuns themselves sometimes organize guided visits to the school: ask the guard at the door or call 932 123 354 In 1888.
Description
Gaudí was commissioned to build this spiritual fortress of Saint Theresa. To carry out the commission, Gaudí read the mystical works of the Catholic saint, and it shows. The symbolism of Saint Theresa is everywhere, as in the T-shaped columns at the end of the cloister corridor. In the centre of the ‘fortress’ there is another column, but it is very simple, because Gaudí imagined that the centre was God’s place and he considered that he could not pretend to create anything to match such absolute beauty. The entrance door is also full of religious details, such as the initials of Jesus, although there are also patriotic references in the wrought-iron four-striped Catalan flag. The characteristic Gothic arches of the building represent the symbol of prayer: the parabolic arches on the façades of the building (windows and ornamental motifs) are continued inside. In the corridors of the first floor, the rhythmic presence of these arches generates an interplay of light and shade that enhances the space giving it the feeling of a convent cloister. Gaudí even designed the plant pots, which had to be orange and green in colour. Orange as the symbol of the Holy Trinity, in which yellow is the Father, red the Son and orange, the mixture, is the Holy Spirit. At the corners of the building Gaudí built helicoidal brick pillars with the coat of arms of the Theresian religious order in ceramic, crowned with four-armed crosses. Another interesting element is the chimney, similar to those in Palau Güell, that presides over the roof terrace of the building. In 2002 the Barcelona Urban Landscape Institute recovered elements and emblems of the façade, and replaced the peculiar “birretas” which had disappeared during the Spanish Civil War -University doctoral caps, yat another sybol of Saint Theresa- back on the roof battlements.

Gaudí was commissioned to build this spiritual fortress of Saint Theresa. To carry out the commission, Gaudí read the mystical works of the Catholic saint, and it shows. The symbolism of Saint Theresa is everywhere, as in the T-shaped columns at the end of the cloister corridor. In the centre of the ‘fortress’ there is another column, but it is very simple, because Gaudí imagined that the centre was God’s place and he considered that he could not pretend to create anything to match such absolute beauty. The entrance door is also full of religious details, such as the initials of Jesus, although there are also patriotic references in the wrought-iron four-striped Catalan flag. The characteristic Gothic arches of the building represent the symbol of prayer: the parabolic arches on the façades of the building (windows and ornamental motifs) are continued inside. In the corridors of the first floor, the rhythmic presence of these arches generates an interplay of light and shade that enhances the space giving it the feeling of a convent cloister. Gaudí even designed the plant pots, which had to be orange and green in colour. Orange as the symbol of the Holy Trinity, in which yellow is the Father, red the Son and orange, the mixture, is the Holy Spirit. At the corners of the building Gaudí built helicoidal brick pillars with the coat of arms of the Theresian religious order in ceramic, crowned with four-armed crosses. Another interesting element is the chimney, similar to those in Palau Güell, that presides over the roof terrace of the building. In 2002 the Barcelona Urban Landscape Institute recovered elements and emblems of the façade, and replaced the peculiar “birretas” which had disappeared during the Spanish Civil War -University doctoral caps, yat another sybol of Saint Theresa- back on the roof battlements.

Up Carrer Ganduxer you will come to Passeig de la Bonanova. If you turn left, near to the convergence of two major roads you will find the CASA MULEY-AFID (93) (Passeig de la Bonanova, 55), a work by Josep Puig i Cadafalch, built in 1911 as a commission for a Moroccan sultan exiled in Barcelona who became very popular because he donated an elephant cow, known as Julia, to the Barcelona Zoo. The building has a certain oriental flavour and is one of the few old mansions in La Bonanova that has not fallen victim to urban development. The building is presently the Mexican Consulate and has been completely restored.

Not far away, going towards Plaça Sarrià, down Carrer Major de Sarrià and taking Carrer Pedró de la Creu and Carrer del Trinquet, is another work by Puig i Cadafalch: CASA SASTRE I MARQUÉS (94) (SASTRE I MARQUÉS HOUSE. Eduardo Conde, 44), a house dating from 1905 in which the architect combined exposed brickwork with sgraffito work and glazed tiles. From this point, go up Carrer del Trinquet, turn right into Carrer dels Caponata and continue to Carrer del Cardenal Sentmenat, where you take the FGC (S1 or S2 lines) at Sarrià Station to Peu del Funicular Station (at this stop the first wagon does not open its doors, so remember to get on at one of the back wagons!).

Vallvidrera is one of the most singular areas in Barcelona because of its privileged geographic location overlooking the city from the heights. This former town, independent from Barcelona until 1890 and part of the Sarrià-Sant Gervasi district today, still preserves some of its essential character: pure air, enviable landscapes and beautiful Modernista buildings. The quickest way to get here from the city centre is by the FGC underground.

The CONJUNT DEL FUNICULAR DE VALLVIDRERA (97), (FUNICULAR RAILWAY OF VALLVIDRERA. Lower station, Avinguda de Vallvidrera, 66, upper station, Queralt, 20), which opened in 1906, has two Modernista buildings by Bonaventura Conill i Montobbio: the ESTACIÓ INFERIOR (LOWER STATION), which has suffered major alterations, and the ESTACIÓ SUPERIOR DE VALLVIDRERA (VALLVIDRERA UPPER STATION), whose best feature is the façade, featuring windows and a door with voluptuous curved lines.


From the lower station, go down Avinguda de Vallvidrera, and you will see the CASA MANUEL DOLCET (96) (MANUEL DOLCET HOUSE. Avinguda de Vallvidrera, 44 interior), a 1907 Modernista building by Joan Rubió i Bellvé featuring a side tower and an open terrace crowned by four Solomonic columns.

Continue down to the end of Avinguda de Vallvidrera, cross Carrer del General Vives and take the number 60 bus (General Vives-Isaac Albèniz stop), to the third stop (Ronda de Dalt-Bellesguard), and then walk along Carrer del General Vives, Carrer Terré and Carrer Benedetti. On the way you will go past the CASA ALEMANY (97) (ALEMANY HOUSE. General Vives, 29), another building by Joan Rubió i Bellvé dating from 1901 and built in brick and stone with elements of Arabian inspiration. Now go down Carrer de Bellesguard to the TORRE BELLESGUARD (98) (BELLESGUARD VILLA. Bellesguard, 20). This mansion, which Gaudí designed for Maria Sagués in 1900, was finished in 1902. These two years are considered to mark the dividing line between the architect’s early and mature work. Gaudí was able to integrate the building perfectly into its natural setting and landscape, whilst respecting its historical content. The medieval ruins of the summer residence of King Martin 1st, the last monarch of the Barcelona dynasty (15th century), were used as a starting point for designing the new building whilst dignifying the historical remains. Gaudí built it to resemble a Gothic-style medieval castle in: the façade is clad in a slate-type stone of grey and green hues, decorated with square boss-type elements and dotted with a large number of windows and with trefoil arches. More than a century after its construction, the building is still a private residence.

Nearby one can see the arches that Gaudí himself designed between 1903 and 1905 in order to consolidate the street leading to Sant Gervasi cemetery and passing next to the Torre Bellesguard. The ten arches are little known, although they are contemporary, and very similar, to the famous arches the architect designed for the Park Güell.

From here go along Carrer de Bellesguard, Carrer de Quatre Camins and Carrer de Císter, where you will come to a TORRE UNIFAMILIAR (99) (SINGLE-FAMILY VILLA. Melilla, 9; Císter, 25) built by an unknown architect in 1907, whose most emblematic feature is a belvedere tower on the corner. It currently houses a café-restaurant. Turn right into Carrer de Melilla and go down Carrer dels Dominics to the: CASA RIALP(100) (RIALP HOUSE. Dominics, 14) by Joan Rubió i Bellvé, dating from 1908, with interesting exposed brickwork and rubble walls. In the interior, which is not open to visitors, there are paintings by Joaquim Torres García, an Uruguayan painter who lived in Barcelona at the time. Continue along Carrer dels Dominics, Carrer de Vendrell, Carrer del Císter and Passeig de Sant Gervasi to Plaça de John Kennedy, at the bottom of Avinguda del Tibidabo, another neighbourhood of Barcelona where many Modernista works are to be found.

To reach the Tibidabo area from any other part of the city you can take Line 7 of the FGC underground to Avinguda del Tibidabo station, or bus numbers 17, 22, 58, 73, 75 and 123, which take you to the bottom of the avenue.

Avinguda del Tibidabo, which begins at the crossroads of Passeig de Sant Gervasi and Carrer Balmes, is a living memory of the early 20th century Barcelona bourgeoisie. In 1889, the entrepreneur and chemist Salvador Andreu -who made pots of money with his famous pills for sore throats- set out to build an amusement park on the hill overlooking Barcelona. To develop this somewhat eccentric dream, Andreu established the company El Tibidabo, with which he bought the large area of barren land stretching from the hilltop down towards the sea to Passeig Sant Gervasi. On these slopes he created a garden city along an elegant avenue, which he opened in 1901 when already a few splendid private residences were being built. The Tibidabo Modernisme walk begins at LA ROTONDA (101) ( Avinguda del Tibidabo, 2), an interesting Modernista building built by Adolf Ruiz i Casamitjana in 1906 to house a hotel, the Metropolitan. The building is now a clinic.

Near La Rotonda, at the beginning of Avinguda del Tibidabo, there is a stop where you can catch the TRAMVIA BLAU (102). (BLUE TRAM). This tram, which originally dates from the Modernista period, is a pleasant way to approach the mountain, on a relaxed ride between majestic houses and gardens up to the funicular lower station. The six trams on the route cover the distance of 1,276 metres, including a difference in altitude of 93 metres, at an average speed of 10 kph. The Tramvia Blau’s first service on 29 October 1901 was the fulfilment of Doctor Salvador Andreu’s ambition to open up an alternative way to the Tibidabo, direct to his funfair at the summit.

Tramvia Blau

Address
Pl. John F. Kennedy / Av. del Tibidabo.
Open
www.tmb.cat/ca/tramvia-blau

It does not run 1 January and 25 December.


Information
www.tmb.cat/ca/tramvia-blau
Prices and discounts
Prices (2017):

     Single ticket: €5,50.

Discount of the Modernisme Route:

€1 discount off the price of a normal single ticket.
Description
Near La Rotonda, at the beginning of Avinguda del Tibidabo, there is a stop where you can catch the TRAMVIA BLAU (102). (BLUE TRAM). This tram, which originally dates from the Modernista period, is a pleasant way to approach the mountain, on a relaxed ride between majestic houses and gardens up to the funicular lower station. The six trams on the route cover the distance of 1,276 metres, including a difference in altitude of 93 metres, at an average speed of 10 kph. The Tramvia Blau’s first service on 29 October 1901 was the fulfilment of Doctor Salvador Andreu’s ambition to open up an alternative way to the Tibidabo, direct to his funfair at the summit. At first the fleet consisted of four trams that covered the route between Passeig de Sant Gervasi, the end of the line for Barcelona’s urban trams, and the lower station of the Tibidabo funicular half way up the mountain. In 1981, following a long period of restoration work, two old trams were put back into operation: tram number 2 from 1901, which had been out of service for 30 years, and the model popularly known as “la Jardinera” (“the Flower Box”) which had once run along the sea front. The renewal of the tracks on 1984 and the construction work on the city’s second ring road in 1990 affected the line’s old route. However, advantage was taken of this circumstance to build a new transformer station and refurbish the tracks and the tram sheds.

At first the fleet consisted of four trams that covered the route between Passeig de Sant Gervasi, the end of the line for Barcelona’s urban trams, and the lower station of the Tibidabo funicular half way up the mountain. In 1981, following a long period of restoration work, two old trams were put back into operation: tram number 2 from 1901, which had been out of service for 30 years, and the model popularly known as “la Jardinera” (“the Flower Box”) which had once run along the sea front. The renewal of the tracks on 1984 and the construction work on the city’s second ring road in 1990 affected the line’s old route. However, advantage was taken of this circumstance to build a new transformer station and refurbish the tracks and the tram sheds.

On the way up Avinguda del Tibidabo you go past three buildings on the opposite side of the road, regarded as belonging to the post-Modernista Noucentista movement. Two on the left hand side: TORRE DEL DOCTOR ANDREU (DOCTOR ANDREU’S VILLA. Avinguda del Tibidabo, 17-19), and TORRE SALVADOR ANDREU (SALVADOR ANDREU’S VILLA. Avinguda del Tibidabo, 21; Josep M. Florensa, 1), both built in the period 1915-1918 by Enric Sagnier i Villavecchia. On the right side, you can see CASA COLL (avinguda del Tibidabo, 28), now a private school but originally a residence, also by the prolific Enric Sagnier. Just in front of Casa Coll, again on the left hand side of the road, is the Modernista TORRE IGNACIO PORTABELLA (103) (avinguda del Tibidabo, 27; Teodor Roviralta, 4) a remarkable work by the master builder José Pérez Terraza (1905), a two-story villa with a semi-circular belvedere.

The next stop on the Route is a building built in phases (1903-1913) by Joan Rubió i Bellvé: CASA ROVIRALTA (104) (avinguda del Tibidabo, 31; Romà Macaya, 1-5). Popularly known as “el Frare Blanc” (“the White Friar”) from the times when it was the home of the Roviralta family. It is now a restaurant proudly showing off its austere white walls and a roof with large eaves, much in Rubió’s style.

Further on up the road there is another building by Rubió i Bellvé (1903), CASA FORNELLS (105) (avinguda del Tibidabo, 35-37; Bosch i Alsina, 1). It is built in a medievalist style in which the use of exposed brickwork, so characteristic of this architect, predominates. Leaving Avinguda del Tibidabo, turn into Bosch i Alsina and keep going until you see COSMOCAIXA-MUSEU DE LA CIÈNCIA (106), (COSMOCAIXA-SCIENCE MUSEUM). The museum is partly housed in a Modernista building by Josep Domènech i Estapà, constructed between 1904 and 1909 as a home for the blind.

CosmoCaixa, Museu de la Ciència

Address
Isaac Newton, 26.
Open
Tuesday to Sunday, from 10am to 8pm. Closed on Mondays (except if holiday) and on January 1st and 6th and December 25th.
Information
Tel.: 932 126 050. www.fundacio.lacaixa.es
Further details
Timetables may vary.
Prices and discounts
General entrance: €4.00, including the temporary and permanent exhibitions.

Free: children up to 15 years

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 25% off the general entrance price.
Description
Leaving Avinguda del Tibidabo, turn into Bosch i Alsina and keep going until you see COSMOCAIXA-MUSEU DE LA CIÈNCIA (106), (COSMOCAIXA-SCIENCE MUSEUM). The museum is partly housed in a Modernista building by Josep Domènech i Estapà, constructed between 1904 and 1909 as a home for the blind. A new building has been attached in 2004 to open CosmoCaixa Barcelona, the new Science Museum of the “la Caixa” Foundation, and Domènech’s building is now mainly used for administrative and educational purposes, and for the museum’s restaurant.The actual museum is in a modern, spacious building, and has been specially designed to be attractive both to children and adults, with a wide range of scientific and educational information, exhibitions, conferences, workshops, seminars and debates. The permanent exhibit, the Matter Hall, leads the visitor through time, from the Big Bang to present day. The Flooded Forest and the Geological Wall are two of the main features of this exhibit. CosmoCaixa also has a planetarium and several areas specifically for children, and activities are constantly going on in its Auditorium and conference halls. The museum has also opened a new public space to the city, the Plaça de la Ciència (Science Square).


A new building has been attached in 2004 to open CosmoCaixa Barcelona, the new Science Museum of the “la Caixa” Foundation, and Domènech’s building is now mainly used for administrative and educational purposes, and for the museum’s restaurant.The actual museum is in a modern, spacious building, and has been specially designed to be attractive both to children and adults, with a wide range of scientific and educational information, exhibitions, conferences, workshops, seminars and debates. The permanent exhibit, the Matter Hall, leads the visitor through time, from the Big Bang to present day. The Flooded Forest and the Geological Wall are two of the main features of this exhibit. CosmoCaixa also has a planetarium and several areas specifically for children, and activities are constantly going on in its Auditorium and conference halls. The museum has also opened a new public space to the city, the Plaça de la Ciència (Science Square).

From this point, go down Carrer del Císter to the CONVENT DE VALLDONZELLA (107) (VALLDONZELLA MONASTERY. Císter, 39-45) by Bernardí Martorell i Puig in 1910. It has a Gothic style with Gaudinian influences.

To get back to Avinguda del Tibidabo, cross over the Ronda, just in front of the Museum, and continue along Carrer Adrià Margarit to see CASA MUNTADAS (108) (MUNTADAS HOUSE. Avinguda del Tibidabo, 48), a handsome building by Josep Puig i Cadafalch in 1901 that re-creates the façade of a typical Catalan farmhouse, or masia, decorated with simple stucco flower designs framing the doors and windows and following the contours of the crown. A little further up is CASA CASACUBERTA (109) (avinguda del Tibidabo, 56), by Joan Rubió i Bellvé (1907), featuring a wide variety of richly decorated doors and windows that are one of this architect’s trademarks. At the top of Avinguda del Tibidabo, where the Tramvia Blau route terminates, is Plaça del Doctor Andreu, with a music bar at either end of the square. Just in front of the Mirablau bar is one of the area’s largest buildings CASA EVARIST ARNÚS (110) (Manuel Arnús, 1-31). Residence of the Arnús bankers family, this estate -also known as “el Pinar” (“the Pine Grove”)- was designed by the inevitable Enric Sagnier i Villavecchia in 1903. A little further on is the estate caretakers’ house, which is also in Neo-Gothic style. This mansion provides one of the typical night sites of this district: when floodlit, it appears like a castle out of a fairy tale.

Parc d'Atraccions Tibidabo

Address
Plaça del Tibidabo, 3-4.
Open
Open every day of the year except between 6 and 31 January, from Monday to Friday in February and on 25-26 December.

February: from 11am to 5pm, only Saturdays and Sundays.

March: from 11am to 4pm.

April:  from 11am to 5pm.

May:  from 11am to 6pm.

June:  from 11am to 6pm.

July:  from 11am to 7pm.

August:  from 11am to 11pm.

September:  from 11am to 6pm.

October:  from 11am to 6pm.

November:  from 11am to 4pm.

December:  from 11am to 4pm.
Information
Tel.: 932 117 942. www.tibidabo.es
Getting there
“Tibibus”, direct from Plaça Catalunya; or FGC metro, stopping at Peu del Funicular, then take Funicular de Vallvidrera or BUS 111 to the mountain top
Further details.

Prices and discounts
Sky Walk ticket: €12.70.

Full ticket: €22.00.

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 25% off the Sky Walk ticket.
Description
From Plaça del Doctor Andreu you can take the funicular up to the top of the Tibidabo and the PARC D’ATRACCIONS TIBIDABO (111). (TIBIDABO FUNFAIR). The Tibidabo Funfair of Barcelona, opened in 1899 by doctor Salvador Andreu, is one of the three oldest in the world. Its magnificent location, in a natural environment where engineering gems of great historical value -the so-called “emblematic rides”- are found side-by-side with state-of-the-art installations and startling shows, make this one of the most representative leisure spots in Barcelona. The emblematic fairground attractions include the Avió (Aeroplane), which is part of the city’s collective memory, and the Museu d’Autòmats (Automaton Museum), housed in a former theatre dating from 1909. The automaton collection includes pieces from all over the world and some fifty automatons from the early 20th century, some of which are considered to be Modernista. Many of them still work; they range from coin-operated dolls that were once a common sight at fairs throughout Europe, to mechanical games and toys with which the children of the bourgeoisie of the time used to amuse themselves. The museum’s collection is regarded as one of the best in the world, particularly because of the good condition of many of the items, some of which are currently being restored.

From Plaça del Doctor Andreu you can take the funicular up to the top of the Tibidabo and the PARC D’ATRACCIONS TIBIDABO (111). (TIBIDABO FUNFAIR). The Tibidabo Funfair of Barcelona, opened in 1899 by doctor Salvador Andreu, is one of the three oldest in the world.

Its magnificent location, in a natural environment where engineering gems of great historical value -the so-called “emblematic rides”- are found side-by-side with state-of-the-art installations and startling shows, make this one of the most representative leisure spots in Barcelona. The emblematic fairground attractions include the Avió (Aeroplane), which is part of the city’s collective memory, and the Museu d’Autòmats (Automaton Museum), housed in a former theatre dating from 1909. The automaton collection includes pieces from all over the world and some fifty automatons from the early 20th century, some of which are considered to be Modernista. Many of them still work; they range from coin-operated dolls that were once a common sight at fairs throughout Europe, to mechanical games and toys with which the children of the bourgeoisie of the time used to amuse themselves. The museum’s collection is regarded as one of the best in the world, particularly because of the good condition of many of the items, some of which are currently being restored.

From the fairground you can walk down Carretera de Vallvidrera al Tibidabo, where you will find a turn-off taking you the Fabra Observatory. It is a pleasant stroll, but if you don’t want to walk the only way to get here is by taxi or private transport. From Barcelona you take Carretera de Sant Cugat (formerly known as Arrabassada) to Carretera de Vallvidrera al Tibidabo. The OBSERVATORI FABRA (112). ((FABRA OBSERVATORY) belongs to the Barcelona Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, which is in charge of its operation and maintenance. Opened in 1904, the building was designed by the Barcelonan architect Josep Domènech i Estapà. The origin of the Fabra Observatory goes back to the year 1900, when Camil Fabra, the philanthropic industrialist who became first Marquis of Alella, donated a handsome legacy for the construction of an astronomical, meteorological and seismic observatory on Tibidabo. Construction began in 1902 and was completed two years later in 1904.
Observatori Fabra

Address
Carretera de l’Observatori Fabra, s/n.
Open
Night visits:

All year round schedules follow the astronomical calendar.

Daytime visits:

Sunday and public holidays al 11.00am, 12.00am and 13.00pm. Closed: From December 25th to January 6th, Holy Week and August. Previous booking is not required.
Information
Night visits: tel. (+34) 931 701 797 (Sternalia).

Daytime visits: tel. (+34) 93 417 57 36 (Observatori Fabra).
Getting there
From the mountain top, it is a nice stroll down Carretera de Vallvidrera al Tibidabo. From Barcelona, you need a taxi or private transport: follow Carretera de Sant Cugat and turn at Carretera de Vallvidrera al Tibidabo.
Prices and discounts
Night visits:

The sky at night: Fridays, €15.00 Discount of the Modernisme Route: 25%, not applicable to daytime visits, Saturdays or visits including dinner. 

Daytime visits:

2,00€. This offer is not extended to the discount vouchers of the Modernisme Route.
Description
The OBSERVATORI FABRA (112). (FABRA OBSERVATORY) belongs to the Barcelona Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, which is in charge of its operation and maintenance. Opened in 1904, the building was designed by the Barcelonan architect Josep Domènech i Estapà. The origin of the Fabra Observatory goes back to the year 1900, when Camil Fabra, the philanthropic industrialist who became first Marquis of Alella, donated a handsome legacy for the construction of an astronomical, meteorological and seismic observatory on Tibidabo. Construction began in 1902 and was completed two years later in 1904. The building, formed by the juxtaposition of three clearly differentiated bodies (one octagonal, one rectangular and the other in the shape of a cross), is the result of the typical eclectic approach of Domènech i Estapà in dealing with the special purposes for which it was intended. The rectangular volume, ending in a crossing, is cut in two by the vertical opening required for the operation of research equipment, and the octagonal body is crowned by a rotating metal dome, housing the telescope. On the seaward side, the building is decorated by a classically inspired porch which boasts two Neo-Egyptian columns and a pediment with very unusual shapes. The pediment also features a bas-relief depicting the figure of a half-naked woman holding an astrolabe in her left hand. The figure is surrounded by representations of planets and stars, among which you can recognise the Sun and Saturn, so it may be said to be an allegory of astronomy.

Astronomical activity began in 1905 with the observation of an eclipse and has never stopped since, although the most relevant scientific contribution to astronomy were Josep Comas i Solà’s observations and discoveries between 1915 and 1930. Research is still carried out at the Fabra Observatory, but a space has been opened for educational activities and to popularise astronomy among the general public. A new project aimed at schools has started as well as a cycle of night-time observations entitled “Barcelona’s Sky” intended to show visitors the heavenly bodies that can be seen from the city. An interesting option are the “Suppers under the Stars”, in which the visit includes dinner at the garden, a visit to the observatory and the chance to have a glimpse at the stars through its great century-old telescope (only in July, August and September; it is required to book in advance).

The building, formed by the juxtaposition of three clearly differentiated bodies (one octagonal, one rectangular and the other in the shape of a cross), is the result of the typical eclectic approach of Domènech i Estapà in dealing with the special purposes for which it was intended. The rectangular volume, ending in a crossing, is cut in two by the vertical opening required for the operation of research equipment, and the octagonal body is crowned by a rotating metal dome, housing the telescope. On the seaward side, the building is decorated by a classically inspired porch which boasts two Neo-Egyptian columns and a pediment with very unusual shapes. The pediment also features a bas-relief depicting the figure of a half-naked woman holding an astrolabe in her left hand. The figure is surrounded by representations of planets and stars, among which you can recognise the Sun and Saturn, so it may be said to be an allegory of astronomy.

Astronomical activity began in 1905 with the observation of an eclipse and has never stopped since, although the most relevant scientific contribution to astronomy were Josep Comas i Solà’s observations and discoveries between 1915 and 1930. Research is still carried out at the Fabra Observatory, but a space has been opened for educational activities and to popularise astronomy among the general public. A new project aimed at schools has started as well as a cycle of night-time observations entitled “Barcelona’s Sky” intended to show visitors the heavenly bodies that can be seen from the city. An interesting option are the “Suppers under the Stars”, in which the visit includes dinner at the garden, a visit to the observatory and the chance to have a glimpse at the stars through its great century-old telescope (only in July, August and September; it is required to book in advance).

The district of Sant Andreu has a very distinct personality as a result of its long tradition of manufacturing industries and grassroots cultural activities. Three important pieces of its Modernista past have been preserved. On a corner of Gran de Sant Andreu is the modest CASA VIDAL (113) (Pons i Gallarza, 1-3 / Gran de Sant Andreu, 255), an apartment building with a pale green façade built in 1906 by the local architect Joan Torras i Guardiola. Interesting features are the wrought iron balcony railings, with sinuous forms that enhance the unusual roundness of this corner. To the right, on number 306 of this street you will find Farmàcia Guinart, an unusual 1896 chemists’. To the left, continuing along Carrer Gran de Sant Andreu you will come to Passeig Fabra i Puig, the former Rambla de Sant Andreu, where on the corner of Carrer Cuba stands CAN GUARDIOLA (114) (Passeig Fabra i Puig, 13 / Cuba, 2-4), a small Modernista jewel built by Josep Codina i Clapés in 1904. The main interest here is in the decorative features: the crown of the main façade, which is reminiscent of Catalan Baroque, or the balcony doors, which seem to be inspired in the scarce Barcelonan Plateresque. Turning back, cross the Passeig and continue along Carrer Monges. At the intersection of this street and Carrer Vallès stands the small ESGLÉSIA DE SANT PACIÀ. The interest of this modest parish church built in 1895 lies in its interior, where you can see a mosaic, the MOSAIC DE L’ESGLÉSIA DE SANT PACIÀ (115) (Vallès, 40) that Antoni Gaudí designed in his first years as an architect.

 

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